Monday, 20 May 2013

Kids Bathrobe Tutorial ( from a towel)

Hello again!




I have had this idea of making a child's bathrobe from a towel for a while, and yesterday I went for it. In the end, it was a really easy project; it took around 2 hours, and the bathrobe is lovely! I am thinking I could do one for myself...







You will need...

After my first failed attempt (I must confess a towel "died" in the process -it will make nice flannels, mind!) I selected a bigger towel and about 1/2  meter of fabric, and a dress that fits my little one


I also had her at hand to try things on; otherwise you'll need the following measurement: the distance from the base of the neck to the top of the head.

This bathrobe is for a 4 year old and took a regular bath sheet.

I also used a small amount of hemming tape for the appliqué - more on this later.

I used my trusty old sewing machine, and used a short zig-zag to bind all the edges.



Here we go:  



1 - Fold your towel in half and then in half again. Lay it on a flat surface and lay the dress or t-shirt on top, so that the centre of the collar matches the centre corner of the towel and the sleeves extend towards the open side of the towel.

.
2 -Cut around the dress or t-shirt, leaving a good 15cm around.  Do not cut the top of the towel, only around the bottom of the sleeves.




3 -Open the towel and lay it flat like in the picture below, cut the front of the robe all he way to the top - do not worry about creating a neckline at this point.



4- Make the hood using 2 of the pieces of towel you have cut off. Line them up and sew along one side and the top.

Now is a good time to try the hood on the child. Put the hood on and mark how high it needs to be. If the child  is unavailable, use the head measurement from above..

5- Attach the hood to the towel. You will need to measure the width of the hood, then divide by 4. (For instance my hood was 44 cm wide, 44 cm/4=11 cm ).  Now cut the neckline on the robe:  lay the robe flat like you did at the beginning, then fold in half agian, so that you have 4 layers of fabric.  Place your tape measure on a diagonal from the centre point, you'll need a diagonal that is the measurement you calculated ( i.e.  mine was 11 cm) , thencut through all 4 layers.







6 - Pin the hood to the collar you just created, and sew.


7 - Pin the robe under the arms and sides and sew.

8 - You now have a basic ( and rather sad looking) robe. And here starts my favourite part of every project - on with the trimmings!


9 - I cut my fabric to 12 cm wide strips that I ironed onto a bias-tape, although I decided not to cut on the bias (the binding looks quite good, although it'd probably be better to cut on the bias...)


I then pinned and sewed all around the front opening and hood. I also applied this binding around the bottom hem.


I then cut a second strip and sewed it to form a belt. I decided to stitch the belt to the back of the robe to avoid it coming loose.





I then cut two squares from the same fabric using the pinking shears and used them as appliqués.

A note about how I do appliqués.. 

They say necessity is the mother of invention and in this case this is quite true. One day I found myself without fusible interfacing (the type that sticks both sides) and used little strips of hemming tape instead. It worked a treat! I am not sure how much this has saved me on heat'n'bond, but I am guessing quite a bit...


I simply use the hemming tape on the inside of the fabric, and iron it in place, I then zig-zag around the appliqué as per usual.

Et voilà! A very thrifty bathrobe from an old towel! 


I do hope these instructions are quite clear, otherwise...please ask!  






8 comments:

  1. Hello! I found you on pinterest, and I love this little bathrobe! If only I had some littlies of my own to make them for. Pinning this for 'one day!'
    Thanks for sharing :)
    Leanne

    ReplyDelete
  2. I really would like to praise you for writing such a fabulous article. This is really informative and I will for sure refer my friends same.


    Luxury bathrobes


    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice! And so easy to understand! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  4. How big should the hood be? I only ask as my monkey is refusing to try it on as there are pins in it and I may catch him with them lol thats his argument anyway

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks for the great tutorial! We've got a lot of unused towels - now I know what to do with them! I already made a fast and sloppy "test version" and am very convinced that my daughter (2) will love it :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. thank you soo much for this amazing tutorial. i made my 16 month old her first bathrobe following this and i'm a total beginner! i struggled a little with figuring out how to get the hood attached but when i did finally figure it out, i was like, well duh! ^_^ i didn't add any of the lovely trimmings, that'll be for a next time. and i used a towel that had nice teddy bear designs on it, so it didn't look so sad even though it was just a basic robe :) once again, thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for the post, This was exactly what I needed to see. Good list, keep up the good work.
    Bath Sheet

    ReplyDelete
  8. Find the most comfortable and fashionable bathrobe for women. Cotton bathrobes offer long-lasting value in a variety of knit and flannel fabrics for every season and style

    ReplyDelete